A Guide To Physics Problems Part 1 & 2 – by Sidney B. Cahn 2004

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A Guide To Physics Problems Part 1 & 2 - by Sidney B. Cahn 2004A Guide To Physics Problems Part 1 & 2 - by Sidney B. Cahn 2004

A Guide To Physics Problems Part 1 & 2 – by Sidney B. Cahn 2004

Summaries :

In order to equip hopeful graduate students with the knowledge necessary to pass the qualifying examination, the authors have assembled and solved standard and original problems from major American universities – Boston University, University of Chicago, University of Colorado at Boulder, Columbia, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, Michigan State, Michigan Tech, MIT, Princeton, Rutgers, Stanford, Stony Brook, University of Wisconsin at Madison – and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. A wide range of material is covered and comparisons are made between similar problems of different schools to provide the student with enough information to feel comfortable and confident at the exam. Guide to Physics Problems is published in two volumes: this book, Part 1, covers Mechanics, Relativity and Electrodynamics; Part 2 covers Thermodynamics, Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. Praise for A Guide to Physics Problems: Part 1: Mechanics, Relativity, and Electrodynamics: “Sidney Cahn and Boris Nadgorny have energetically collected and presented solutions to about 140 problems from the exams at many universities in the United States and one university in Russia, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. Some of the problems are quite easy, others are quite tough; some are routine, others ingenious.” (From the Foreword by C. N. Yang, Nobelist in Physics, 1957) “Generations of graduate students will be grateful for its existence as they prepare for this major hurdle in their careers.” (R. Shankar, Yale University) “The publication of the volume should be of great help to future candidates who must pass this type of exam.” (J. Robert Schrieffer, Nobelist in Physics, 1972) “I was positively impressed … The book will be useful to students who are studying for their examinations and to faculty who are searching for appropriate problems.” (M. L. Cohen, University of California at Berkeley) “If a student understands how to solve these problems, they have gone a long way toward mastering the subject matter.” (Martin Olsson, University of Wisconsin at Madison) “This book will become a necessary study guide for graduate students while they prepare for their Ph.D. examination. It will become equally useful for the faculty who write the questions.” (G. D. Mahan, University of Tennessee at Knoxville)
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Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics – Eleanor Robson 2009

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Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics - Eleanor Robson 2009

Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics – Eleanor Robson 2009

 

Summaries :

Oxford University Press, 18 Des 2008 – 926 halaman
This Handbook explores the history of mathematics under a series of themes which raise new questions about what mathematics has been and what it has meant to practice it. It addresses questions of who creates mathematics, who uses it, and how. A broader understanding of mathematical practitioners naturally leads to a new appreciation of what counts as a historical source. Material and oral evidence isdrawn upon as well as an unusual array of textual sources. Further, theways in which people have chosen to express themselves are as historically meaningful as the contents of the mathematics they have produced. Mathematics is not a fixed and unchanging entity. New questions, contexts, and applications all influence what counts as productive ways of thinking. Because the historyof mathematics should interact constructively with other ways of studying the past, the contributors to this book come from a diverse range of intellectual backgrounds in anthropology, archaeology, art history, philosophy, and literature, as well as history of mathematics more traditionally understood.The thirty-six self-contained, multifaceted chapters, each written by a specialist, are arranged under three main headings: ‘Geographies and Cultures‘, ‘Peoples and Practices’, and ‘Interactions and Interpretations’. Together they deal with the mathematics of 5000 years, but without privileging the past three centuries, and an impressive range of periods and places with many points of cross-reference between chapters. The key mathematical cultures of North America, Europe, the Middle East,India, and China are all represented here as well as areas which are not often treated in mainstream history of mathematics, such as Russia, the Balkans, Vietnam, and South America. A vital reference for graduates and researchers in mathematics, historians of science, and general historians.
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