2D Object Detection and Recognition Models, Algorithms, and Networks – Yali Amit

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PREFACE :
This book is about detecting and recognizing 2D objects in gray-level images. How are models constructed? How are they trained? What are the computational approaches to efficient implementation on a computer? And finally, how can some of these computations be implemented in the framework of parallel and biologically plausible neural network architectures?

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50 Math and Science Games for Leadership – Seah Wee Khee

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Did you like Math or Science in school? Have you played games that stimulated your thought processes for Math and Science? Trying to be creative in your Math, Science or leadership class? Can leadership be taught? Is leadership an Art or a Science or Math? Seeking to impact your training program with creative games? Continue reading

Data Compression: The Complete Reference – David Salomon

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Data compression is one of the most important fields and tools in modern computing. From archiving data, to CD ROMs, and from coding theory to image analysis, many facets of modern computing rely upon data compression.

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A Smoother Pebble; Mathematical Explorations – Donald C. Benson 2003

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A Smoother Pebble; Mathematical Explorations - Donald C. Benson 2003

A Smoother Pebble; Mathematical Explorations – Donald C. Benson 2003

 

Summaries :
Oxford University Press, 4 Okt 2003 – 280 halaman
This book takes a novel look at the topics of school mathematics–arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and calculus. In this stroll on the mathematical seashore we hope to find, quoting Newton, “…a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary…” This book assembles a collection of mathematical pebbles that are important as well as beautiful.
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The Art of the Infinite; The Pleasures of Mathematics – Robert Kaplan 2003

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The Art of the Infinite; The Pleasures of Mathematics - Robert Kaplan 2003

The Art of the Infinite; The Pleasures of Mathematics – Robert Kaplan 2003

Book Description

Publication Date: April 3, 2003 | ISBN-10: 019514743X | ISBN-13: 978-0195147438 | Edition: First Printing
Robert Kaplan’s The Nothing That Is: A Natural History of Zero was an international best-seller, translated into eight languages. The Times called it “elegant, discursive, and littered with quotes and allusions from Aquinas via Gershwin to Woolf” and The Philadelphia Inquirer praised it as “absolutely scintillating.”
In this delightful new book, Robert Kaplan, writing together with his wife Ellen Kaplan, once again takes us on a witty, literate, and accessible tour of the world of mathematics. Where The Nothing That Is looked at math through the lens of zero, The Art of the Infinite takes infinity, in its countless guises, as a touchstone for understanding mathematical thinking. Tracing a path from Pythagoras, whose great Theorem led inexorably to a discovery that his followers tried in vain to keep secret (the existence of irrational numbers); through Descartes and Leibniz; to the brilliant, haunted Georg Cantor, who proved that infinity can come in different sizes, the Kaplans show how the attempt to grasp the ungraspable embodies the essence of mathematics. The Kaplans guide us through the “Republic of Numbers,” where we meet both its upstanding citizens and more shadowy dwellers; and we travel across the plane of geometry into the unlikely realm where parallel lines meet. Along the way, deft character studies of great mathematicians (and equally colorful lesser ones) illustrate the opposed yet intertwined modes of mathematical thinking: the intutionistnotion that we discover mathematical truth as it exists, and the formalist belief that math is true because we invent consistent rules for it.
“Less than All,” wrote William Blake, “cannot satisfy Man.” The Art of the Infinite shows us some of the ways that Man has grappled with All, and reveals mathematics as one of the most exhilarating expressions of the human imagination.
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The Cambridge Dictionary of Statistics – B. S. Everitt 2006

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The Cambridge Dictionary of Statistics - B. S. Everitt 2006

The Cambridge Dictionary of Statistics – B. S. Everitt 2006

If you work with data and need easy access to clear, reliable definitions and explanations of modern statistical and statistics-related concepts, then look no further than this dictionary. Nearly 4000 terms are defined, covering medical, survey, theoretical, and applied statistics, including computational and graphical aspects. Entries are provided for standard and specialized statistical software. In addition, short biographies of over 100 important statisticians are given. Definitions provide enough mathematical detail to clarify concepts and give standard formula when these are helpful. The majority of definitions then give a reference to a book or article where the user can seek further or more specialized information, and many are accompanied by graphical material to aid understanding.

 

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Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics – Eleanor Robson 2009

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Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics - Eleanor Robson 2009

Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics – Eleanor Robson 2009

 

Summaries :

Oxford University Press, 18 Des 2008 – 926 halaman
This Handbook explores the history of mathematics under a series of themes which raise new questions about what mathematics has been and what it has meant to practice it. It addresses questions of who creates mathematics, who uses it, and how. A broader understanding of mathematical practitioners naturally leads to a new appreciation of what counts as a historical source. Material and oral evidence isdrawn upon as well as an unusual array of textual sources. Further, theways in which people have chosen to express themselves are as historically meaningful as the contents of the mathematics they have produced. Mathematics is not a fixed and unchanging entity. New questions, contexts, and applications all influence what counts as productive ways of thinking. Because the historyof mathematics should interact constructively with other ways of studying the past, the contributors to this book come from a diverse range of intellectual backgrounds in anthropology, archaeology, art history, philosophy, and literature, as well as history of mathematics more traditionally understood.The thirty-six self-contained, multifaceted chapters, each written by a specialist, are arranged under three main headings: ‘Geographies and Cultures‘, ‘Peoples and Practices’, and ‘Interactions and Interpretations’. Together they deal with the mathematics of 5000 years, but without privileging the past three centuries, and an impressive range of periods and places with many points of cross-reference between chapters. The key mathematical cultures of North America, Europe, the Middle East,India, and China are all represented here as well as areas which are not often treated in mainstream history of mathematics, such as Russia, the Balkans, Vietnam, and South America. A vital reference for graduates and researchers in mathematics, historians of science, and general historians.
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